Masks cause drastic sores and mouth decay in children

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Cheilitis, yeast infections (oral thrush), gingivitis, ulcers, caries, and halitosis are just a few mask side effects.

This article won’t be posted on Facebook, as that would surely land us another thirty day stint in Zuck jail. Anything to do with masks, otherwise known as compliance symbols, is perhaps the most censored information of our time at the moment.

Reports on Facebook from concerned mothers across the nation show that thousands of children are developing questionable mouth sores as a result of prolonged mask usage.

According to Everyday Health, sores develop in the mouth due to prolonged usage of masks, especially in warm environments.

Everyday Health

“‘Anyone who’s worn a mask in the summertime knows that it can get hot under there. And masks offer the perfect conditions for overgrowth. Candida thrives in humid environments, much like the one created under your mask. While a face mask can’t be the sole cause of a skin infection, the combination of heat, humidity, and a tight mask could worsen underlying conditions that prompt a fungal or bacterial infection.’”

Dental Tribune

And according to Dr. Pooja Muley, “Dentists all over the world have started to notice an increase in patients with complaints of halitosis, gingivitis, ulcers and caries. All these symptoms are being linked to the excessive and improper use of a mask. Etiology Mask mouth is triggered by covering mouth for longer periods of time which increases the dryness of the mouth. Also, there is an increased incidence of mouth breathing when using a mask. Mouth breathing causes surface dehydration and reduced salivary flow rate (SFR). When the salivary function is diminished, there is more risk of patient’s developing caries, gingivitis, halitosis and having diseases such as candidiasis than there is in patients who have normal SFRs [1].”

Mask Mouth via Dental Tribune

According to all major outlets, however, the benefits of wearing a mask “outweigh” the costs. Clearly, the writers of the cost benefit analysis of mask wearing will force their school aged children to endure mouth sores, acne, ulcers, cheilitis, and oral yeast infections…it’s for their safety, after all.

To prevent such sores, don’t wear a mask. Americans should obviously avoid making children wear masks, as mouth sores in children are harder to spot during development. If you must force your kids into compliance, consider a mesh or lace mask, a face guard, or at a minimum use disposable masks versus cloth masks which harbor moisture and bacteria.

The Colorado Herald