Dominion software, responsible for Michigan glitch, used in 30 states including Colorado

Dominion software in Colorado

Thirty states use voting software by Dominion. According to the Colorado Secretary of State’s website, all but two Colorado counties use Dominion as their voting software. Dominion is the software responsible for the infamous glitch in Michigan that caused an “accidental” 6000 vote swing for Biden

The two counties in Colorado that didn’t use Dominion are Garfield, which elected Republicans down ballot aside from Hickenlooper, and Douglas, where Republicans also predominantly won.

States that use Dominion, from Dominion’s website

Across Twitter, IT analysts and company owners have shouted for days that the voting software made by Dominion is not only easily hacked, but likely to be fraudulent thank to it’s vulnerability and ease of hacking by Scorecard and Hammer, voter hacking software suspected of the Michigan and Wisconsin overnight swings.

In the 2020 Georgia primaries, Dominion was responsible for what Georgians called the election “hot mess.” In total, 30,000 machines were purchased from Dominion by the state of Georgia in 2019…for $107 million dollars. Primaries were a mess for Georgia, thanks to those machines.

Five months later, Georgia experienced massive glitches on Election Day, thanks to Dominion Voting Systems. According to Georgia election officials, the glitches were caused by an employee “uploading an update,” though no one can say what the update was.

Even after the Georgia “hot mess,” security measures were never mandated by the federal or state governments. Though bipartisan attempts were made in 2019 to ensure some election security via third party voting systems, nothing ever passed. To date, there are barely any regulations on voting system companies.

Dominion Voting Systems was founded in 2003 and is based in Denver. The company has quickly become the second largest voting company in the US, and last year Dominion hired a firm to assist with election security. The firm Dominion hired in 2019 was Brownstein Farber Hyatt & Schreck, which lists Nadeam Elshami, Pelosi’s former chief of staff, as a lobbyist.

Dominion also has ties to Hillary Clinton. The Clinton Global Initiative benefited beginning in 2018 from voting software for “emerging democracies” that the Clintons and HRC help “emerge.” However terrifying the idea of the Clinton’s and a “glitching” software company helping democracies emerge may be, the details of the deal are listed on the GCI website.

An election official in Alameda County even recounts how easy it is to create ballots via Dominion. Recounts are demanded now from several states, as thirty states use the software. State Rep Paul Gossar of Arizona has called for any county that used Dominion to undergo a hand recount.

One of the massive controversies surrounding Dominion lies in Michigan, which currently shows Biden as the presidential winner by 145,945 votes. That’s convenient since 149,790 people in Michigan voted in the presidential election but didn’t vote in Michican’s senate race It’s not only convenient; it’s statistically impossible.

Insiders to the software say that Hammer and Scorecard, cheating software programs, are integrated into Dominion when needed. The software can ascertain, in real time, how many votes are needed for a particular candidate and add those votes between the user interface and the state’s data aggregation. The programs were written by the CIA but later privatized by Obama.

Hammer and Scorecard have been suspected of stealing votes in the past, through various other elections, but there’s never been a smoking gun. Rumors swirled this week that Trump and the military secretly had ballots printed with watermarks to overcome fraud via voting systems, but this remains to be seen.

While the controversy surrounding Dominion Voting Systems continues to mount, one thing demons certain. This election won’t be over for quite a while.